Los Angeles Times: Debunking eight myths about homelessness and Proposition HHH

Los Angeles Times: Debunking eight myths about homelessness and Proposition HHH


The city of Los Angeles has put a proposal on the ballot that could significantly reduce chronic homelessness: Proposition HHH, which would authorize $1.2 billion in general obligation bonds to fund the creation of 10,000 units of supportive housing for homeless people and affordable housing for those at risk of becoming homeless. But critics of the ambitious measure have spawned a number of myths about the homelessness problem and what the proposition would do about it. Read more from the LA Times


LA Weekly: Why This Anti-Tax Crusader is Supporting Prop. HHH, a Property Tax to Fight Homelessness

LA Weekly: Why This Anti-Tax Crusader is Supporting Prop. HHH, a Property Tax to Fight Homelessness


Richard Close is no fan of tax increases. The land-use attorney is the longtime president of the Sherman Oaks homeowner’s association and one of the leading voices of the “tax revolt” that brought us Proposition 13, the 1978 statewide ballot measure that drastically cut property taxes in California. He was also a central figure in the San Fernando Valley secession movement of the early 2000s.


Los Angeles Downtown News: Vote Yes on Proposition HHH

Los Angeles Downtown News: Vote Yes on Proposition HHH


“Los Angeles Downtown News urges a yes vote on Proposition HHH come Election Day. It will benefit Downtown, which still has the largest contingent of homeless individuals in the region. It will also help the rest of the city.”


Los Angeles Times: Proposition HHH could finally make a dent in homelessness in L.A. Vote yes.

Los Angeles Times: Proposition HHH could finally make a dent in homelessness in L.A. Vote yes.


“It’s ambitious, expensive, and — finally — the city’s first real commitment to provide housing on the scale necessary to significantly reduce chronic homelessness. It deserves a ‘yes’ vote … Proposition HHH represents just one (albeit critical) part of the city and county’s response. It won’t clear the streets of homeless people within a few months or a couple of years. But without these housing projects, the problem cannot be solved. Let’s stop pretending we don’t see it.”


MORE THAN 30 RELIGIOUS LEADERS URGE YES VOTE ON PROP HHH TO END HOMELESSNESS

MORE THAN 30 RELIGIOUS LEADERS URGE YES VOTE ON PROP HHH TO END HOMELESSNESS


$1.2 billion bond issue on November ballot would supercharge construction of permanent supportive housing, helping thousands leave the street

Gathering at the Episcopal Diocese’s Cathedral Center in Echo Park on Wednesday, more than thirty religious leaders representing major faith communities in the Los Angeles region lent their support to Prop HHH. In a consultation convened by the Right Reverend J. Jon Bruno, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles and Mayor Eric Garcetti, the religious leaders added their names to the already wide-ranging list of endorsements for the ballot proposition, which includes dozens of elected officials, civic leaders, and advocates and service providers grappling with homelessness in Los Angeles.

“Our faith traditions call us to serve neighbors in need,” said Bruno, president of the Los Angeles Council of Religious Leaders, which has voted to endorse the bond measure. “Prop HHH gives L.A. a strategic way forward to house the homeless with respect for the dignity of every human being.”

With homelessness rising across the city, Angelenos want to help but often feel overwhelmed. Prop HHH on the November ballot offers a critical piece of the solution. The proposition— “Housing and Hope to End Homelessness”— would allow the city to finance the 10,000 units of Permanent Supportive Housing needed to house all the city’s chronically homeless residents.

“L.A.’s faith community has always been our moral conscience in the work of getting homeless Angelenos the help and housing they need,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Today, I am proud to have their support and partnership to ensure the passage of Proposition HHH. People in the grip of homelessness can’t and shouldn’t have to wait another moment for the permanent supportive housing those dollars would provide.”

Permanent supportive housing has an extraordinary record. Local success rates exceed 90%. Housing is 43% less expensive than leaving men and women on the street—and infinitely more humane.

Prop HHH would raise $1.2 billion to finance the construction of permanent supportive housing over the next 10 years, and could expect to leverage three times its value from other sources of funds. It would triple the pace that Los Angeles currently builds housing, resulting in 1,000 new units annually. Residents would have access to facilities for mental health, drug and alcohol treatment. The bond could also finance affordable housing for the Angelenos at greatest risk of homelessness, as well as temporary shelters, storage and shower facilities. Repaying the bond would add approximately $33 per year to the average Los Angeles property tax bill ($9.64/$100,000 assessed value).

For more about Prop HHH, please visit www.YesOnHHH.com.


MAYOR, COUNCILMEMBERS, CIVIC LEADERS, FORMERLY HOMELESS ALL SAY: VOTE YES ON PROP HHH — HOUSING & HOPE TO END HOMELESSNESS

MAYOR, COUNCILMEMBERS, CIVIC LEADERS, FORMERLY HOMELESS ALL SAY: VOTE YES ON PROP HHH — HOUSING & HOPE TO END HOMELESSNESS


$1.2 billion bond issue on November 2016 ballot would get thousands off the street, more than triple the pace of permanent supportive housing construction

Dozens of elected officials, civic leaders, and homelessness service providers joined with formerly homeless residents of permanent supportive housing Monday to urge Angelenos to vote yes on Prop HHH on the November 2016 ballot.

“Everyone in Los Angeles is touched by the homelessness crisis impacting our City and this November’s ballot offers a way for voters to support lasting change,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “By voting for Proposition HHH, local residents can help build the thousands of new permanent supportive housing units we need to get our most vulnerable off the streets and into a home for good.”

With homelessness rising across the city, Angelenos want to help but often feel overwhelmed. Prop HHH on the November ballot offers a critical piece of the solution. The proposition— “Housing and Hope to End Homelessness”— would allow the city to finance the 10,000 units of Permanent Supportive Housing needed to house all the city’s chronically homeless residents.

“We have an opportunity before us to better the lives of thousands of men, women, and children living on our streets,” said Los Angeles City Council President Herb J. Wesson, Jr. “Together let’s heed the call to strengthen the city for generations to come.”

Permanent supportive housing has an extraordinary record. Local success rates exceed 90%. Housing is 43% less expensive than leaving men and women on the street—and infinitely more humane.

“When I got my home, I felt safe,” said Silvia Hernandez, a formerly homeless woman who now advocates with the Downtown Women’s Center. “I had hope. I found the strength to fight for other people. That’s why I’m fighting for Prop HHH.”

The bond proposal was co-authored by Homelessness & Poverty Committee (H&P) Chair Councilmember Marqueece Harris-Dawson and Vice-Chair Councilmember José Huizar, and was adopted by the Los Angeles City Council in June. Under the leadership of Council President Herb Wesson, the H&P committee to address homelessness was established in the summer of 2015. The committee has worked with Wesson, the City Council, CAO, CLA and Mayor’s office to usher in a strategic homelessness plan and last week announced Meg Barclay as the City’s first-ever Homelessness Coordinator.

“It is fundamentally wrong to have people living on the streets – especially women, children, veterans and people with mental illnesses,” said Councilmember José Huizar. “That is why we as a City have responded with unprecedented funding, a comprehensive strategic plan and a standing committee and homelessness coordinator to implement that plan. Homelessness is the moral dilemma of our generation and the most pressing issue we as a City face. Now we need the voters to help us address it head-on, and we urge their support for Proposition HHH.”

“We stand at the precipice, the beginning of the end of homelessness as we know it in the City of Los Angeles,” said Councilmember Marqueece Harris-Dawson. “Proposition HHH will be a down payment on what will be a long term and sustained effort to qualitatively impact the lives of homeless individuals and families”

Prop HHH would raise $1.2 billion dollars to finance the construction of permanent supportive housing over the next 10 years, and could expect to leverage three times its value from other sources of funds. It would triple the pace that Los Angeles currently builds housing. Residents would have access to facilities for mental health, drug and alcohol treatment. The bond could also finance affordable housing for the Angelenos at greatest risk of homelessness, as well as temporary shelters, storage and shower facilities. Repaying the bond would add approximately $33 per year to the average Los Angeles property tax bill ($9.64/$100,000 assessed value).

“We have the power to transform people’s lives and make sure they have a place to call home,” said Elise Buik, President & CEO of United Way of Greater Los Angeles. “Permanent supportive housing solutions has already cut down veterans homelessness by 60%, and passing HHH will let us see similar reductions and more across the board.”

“We’ve done far too little for far too long,” said Rusty Hicks, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO. “And thinking small is unworthy of a great city like Los Angeles. For any Angeleno who wants to know how they can help end homelessness, the answer is this: vote Yes on Prop HHH on November 8th.”

“The consequences and causes of homelessness are multi-faceted, but the first step is to provide safe and secure housing,” said Gary Toebben, President & CEO of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. “Speaking as a representative of Los Angeles’s business community, permanent supportive housing is a proven solution. Getting people off the street helps them focus on their other needs and continue their lives with dignity—while freeing up resources from emergency care, policing and other social services.”

“The safe, comfortable units here in the New Genesis are just 106 of the thousands of examples of permanent supportive housing that already exists throughout our city,” said Mike Alvidrez, Chief Executive Officer of the Skid Row Housing Trust. “Clearly, we need more permanent supportive housing to make Los Angeles a better city, and that is what Prop HHH is all about.”

For more about Prop HHH, please visit www.YesOnHHH.com.